Brenda Garand / Gerald Auten / Stuart Ober / Craig Hood

July 18 – August 23

Brenda Garand and Gerald Auten

Stuart Ober, Craig Hood

Opening Reception Saturday, July 18, 5-7 pm

Click Here for a PDF of the Invitation

Brenda Garand, Mantiou, Steel, roofing paper, wire, wool, silk, fabric. 84 x 60 x 15". 2014

Brenda Garand, Mantiou, Steel, roofing paper, wire, wool, silk, fabric. 84 x 60 x 15″. 2014

Gerald Auten, Untitled, Graphite on paper, 24 x 18". 2011

Gerald Auten, Untitled, Graphite on paper, 24 x 18″. 2011

Brenda Garand and Gerald Auten

Brenda Garand uses steel wire, roofing paper, wool and silk threads, fabric and various found objects to create her gossamer like forms that cast repetitive shadows on the gallery walls. Garand is a New Englander of French Canadian, Abenaki and English descent and bases her work on the rich history and observations of the northeast.

Gerald Auten uses graphite pencils and powders on hot-pressed paper surfaces to make elegant drawings that are velvety, reflective and dense. By combining various geometric shapes he creates bold images that have multiple dimensions. What may at first appear as a shape on the surface can suddenly morph into a mysterious inner or outer space.

Both artists are colleagues at Dartmouth college. They have first exhibited widely and are pleased to be exhibiting together for the first time. Click Here to view images of the Installation

 


 

 

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Stuart Ober

There is a quiet stillness in Stuart Ober’s small representational landscape and still life paintings. His choice and placement of the objects and the closely edited landscapes are thoughtful and personal. The artist describes his work as “dealing with everyday life and objects in a way that searches for an intersection with the sometimes uneasy world of emotion.”

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Craig Hood, Serenade at King’s Point, Oil on canvas, 34 x 40″. 2012

Craig Hood

The landscape and still life settings in Craig Hood’s recent paintings and drawings are partially obscured by an atmospheric haze. An observer must mentally draw this ethereal curtain aside to make out the scene beyond. These are mysterious, desolate spaces with a mix of sorrow and humor. Hood is a tenured professor at the University of New Hampshire and has exhibited his work in the United States, Canada and Japan.

Click Here for images